Tips on Where to Look for a Job

Finding a job is a tedious task. It involves filling-up so many application forms, as well as presenting yourself through gruelling job interviews. If you desire to get the job you so wanted, you should not be limited in your approach. Successful job hunters exhaust all measures and search all employment sources to get the best results.
But what must you do to expedite your job search? First, you must know where to look for a job. Below is just a partial list of the many possibilities you may try:
Online Job Search. This is easy to do right in the comfort of your home or in any Internet café. Prepare your résumé and application form, and be ready to send it to a thousand companies in such a short time. By using key words, you may find jobs by location, by job title, or even by salary. However, as this is the easiest method for job search, more than a million job seekers respond to these job postings, thus lowering your chances.
Networking. Tell your relatives and friends that you are looking for a job. This will work better if you had kept in touch by attending school reunions and other social functions that allows you to retain your old ties. The advantage of networking is that most of the people know you, and are willing to recommend you to prospective employers. A large percentage of high-level positions are filled through this method since such sensitive positions usually demand a reliable character.
Career Placement in School. If you are about to graduate, remember that most schools offer some kind of job placement assistance to their alumni and students. They are often in partnership with some companies who reach out directly to schools to source for their prospective employees.
Bulletin Board. You may check your campus bulletin boards. There are some establishments who post flyers or posters of their help wanted ads there. There is an advantage to responding to these ads, because the companies who post their job ads in your school already have a close relationship with your alma mater. This also shows their preference of hiring employees who are graduates of your university.
Newspapers. Most jobs are advertised in the classifieds section of broadsheet newspapers. The large number of ads helps you select better from among the many companies who posted their vacancies. Besides, judging from the size of the ads, you will know which companies are big and more likely to offer the best compensation. You may buy a newspaper any day, although most people prefer Sundays because there are more companies to choose from. Still, I also recommend trying other days, especially Wednesdays, because there will be less applicants to compete with.
Job or Career Fairs. Job or career fairs are regularly participated in by employers to help them find the right employees for their companies. You may search the internet or find in the newspaper when and where the fairs are being held. A job or career fair is like a one-stop-shop for a job seeker. You may submit applications, and be interviewed on the same day by several companies. Just a tip: do not bother to apply to companies that do not interest you. You have limited time, so make the most of it.
Social Networking Sites. You may improve your professional and business connections by using your Facebook, Friendster, MySpace, and LinkedIn account. Just encode your credentials, skills, or other talents, so people in your network would remember you in case they need to contract your service. However, you have to be very careful when using these sites. You have to draw the line, as to using these for personal or professional purposes. If you will use these accounts for professional networking, make sure that the contents are relevant to your career. Limit use of graphics, and pictures. Do not post anything you would not like an employer to see. Detail all your job experiences, as well as previous positions held. Most importantly, make sure you choose your friends wisely.
After going through all of the employment sources above in your job quest, you will find that each has its strengths and weaknesses. What is important to remember is that the more avenues you explore the brighter your chances of getting the job you desire.
*Originally published by the Manila Bulletin. Written by Ruben Anlacan, Jr. (President, BusinessCoach, Inc.) All rights reserved. May not be reproduced or copied without express written permission of the copyright holders.
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